selected works

Here is a selection of sculpture I have made over the years for my own personal enjoyment. Rather than portraits or commissioned work, it's what I call 'my' sculpture. Note that there's not much of it; for the last decade I have been either doing commissioned work or teaching almost all the time. It's only recently that I have managed to give more of my time to pursuing work of personal interest, and in the next year I will be finishing some larger projects that have been percolating for quite a while.

My main interest in sculpture is in mythological and religious symbolic work. I am completely inspired by the writing of Joseph Campbell, whose theories on folklore, myth, and religion from around the world put forth the idea that they are all telling a common story, known as the Monomyth. The Monomyth really is just the story of universal human experience - growing up and leaving home, struggling to find one's place and purpose, and in the end, hopefully, becoming the person one was meant to be. It's a story which resonates universally. Reflections of the Monomyth can be found everywhere in literature and culture, from Star Wars to the Arthurian Legends to the Wizard of Oz. 

The sculpture I've made that pleases me the most tend to be the ones that illustrate, in one way or another, characters and events caught up in the enactment of the Monomyth, especially in moments of symbolic significance. Some are more or less literal passages from various texts, like The Frog Prince; some riff on their themes a bit, like my John the Baptist being stung on the back of the neck by a bee as he gathers his wild honey in the wilderness, a harbinger of the pain in the neck that is to come for him; others fabricate nonexistent myths in order to more clearly illustrate the mysteries of the themes of the Monomyth, without the baggage of a larger narrative, like my Bathing Girl And The Sea Dragon.

I'm naturally drawn to character and narrative- the various aspects of storytelling - in sculpture. Likewise, I'm attracted to the use of objects and subjects in art which raise more questions than they answer, or provide not so much a concrete thesis or statement than a mood or an instinctual reaction. The sculptors I'm looking at the most these days are the Symbolists of the 19th Century, sculptors like Alfred Gilbert and George Frampton, but also painters associated with the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. increasingly, I have been drawn to the Arts and Crafts Movement in the UK in the 19th century, and I'm currently experimenting with various media and crafts, as much for my personal enjoyment as anything else. But if I hit upon a solid method of combining figurative sculpture with, say textiles or stained glass, you'll see the results of that here.

 

Goliath

Goliath

Hope

Hope

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Wold Honey

Wold Honey

The Bathing Girl and The Sea Dragon

The Bathing Girl and The Sea Dragon

The Frog Prince

The Frog Prince